Judges rely on the PSR (or the inmates bible), and how it dictates the defendants future. This is another example of why the PSR is the most important document you will submit to the court following a guilty verdict, before sentencing. Another guideline resource is: LEGAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO THE FEDERAL BUREAU OF PRISONS.

The BOP has sole authority to designate the place of confinement for federal prisoners: See 18 U.S.C. § 3621(b). By statute, the BOP is required to consider the resources of the facility, the nature and circumstances of the offense, the history and characteristics of the prisoner, recommendations of the court, and guidance issued by the USSC. Initial designation decisions and decisions to transfer prisoners from one facility to another are ultimately the responsibility of the BOP and are made in accordance with Program Statement 5100.08, Inmate Security Designation and Custody Classification.

The Judgment and Commitment Order (US federal courts) is abbreviated J&C, may indicate the sentencing court’s recommendation to house the inmate in a specific institution, geographic area, or specialized program. While every effort is made to comply with the court’s recommendation, conflict with BOP policy and sound correctional management may prevent honoring the court’s recommendation. Prior to finalizing plea agreements or other concessions affecting a defendant’s conditions of confinement, the parties involved should consult with the relevant Consolidated Legal Center (CLC) regarding factors that might affect availability of the program, or the eligibility of an individual defendant for any program assignment.

Specific programs or institution placements should not be part of any agreement or promised to any criminal defendant. This is particularly important when defendants carry both state and federal sentences, as complex issues arise over which sovereign has priority to implement its sentence.

How the Federal Sentencing Table (Page 2); Determines Sentencing in the BOP

2016 USSC Sentencing Ethics (Defense)

2018: USSC Introduction to the Guidelines (Federal Sentencing Guidelines)

2016 USSC Over-Incarceration

2018 Slideshow: USSC Departures and Variances

Rule 32. Sentencing and Judgment