INDICTED: The Importance of Your Case Manager

INDICTED: The Importance of Your Case Manager

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all. Should you wish to engage my services, my contact information is at the end.

Welcome to my video series, “INDICTED AND FACING PRISON?” My name is Marc Blatstein, and I know firsthand how surreal and overwhelming this experience can be. That’s why I’m here to provide you with crucial daily information. You can navigate these Challenging times with Knowledge, Preparation, and Confidence.

The DOJ and Feds have been asking questions; their case is mostly complete. With a 98% conviction rate, the odds are not in your favor. However, knowledge is power, and it’s in your hands. Delaying your next step could have severe consequences.

Your future is at stake, so hiring a legal team with a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours is critical. Don’t just settle for experience; choose a team that can get you the best outcome. Make the right choices now, and you can move forward with confidence.

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

·      Show your Case Managers that you are committed to achieving personal growth and development. This commitment to your Case Manager and Unit Team can be a powerful tool for achieving your goals.

It is important to make the most of every opportunity to showcase your efforts, as this will differentiate you from everyone else.

Your Case Manager is another STAKEHOLDER, and with everything you do and say, consider:

·      How Will They View You?

·      As you have your first meeting, you can work into a conversation – no matter how short: “I researched, read online, and understand the importance of a Release Plan.”

If you’re already at this point and don’t have the time to wait for my future videos, call me, and we can discuss your situation one-on-one. Once again, my number is 240.888.7778.

•                  I understand and look forward to your guidance, but I’d like to show you what I have done already as I began it before sentencing, which is a new phase.”

•                  Then I’ll keep you updated as I grow it during my stay.

NOTE: Some staff may not even give you 60 seconds, but please don’t take it personally. Continue documenting and wait until the next meeting.

•                  This is a job for them, too, so as they see you improving and following through on what you have told them, they will look good if they can point to you as a success story to their supervisors. (“If you help people get what they want – they will help you get what you want.”)

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today: 240.888.7778. This is my Cell and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.

First Step Act and its Benefits

A Comprehensive Review of Federal Prison Reform

What is the First Step Act and its Benefits?

The First Step Act, endorsed into law by President Donald Trump in December 2018, is one of the most impactful federal prison and sentencing reforms in recent years. Its primary objective is to diminish recidivism rates and mass incarceration through comprehensive prison reforms and an expansion of judicial discretion in sentencing for nonviolent crimes.

 

The legislation includes several important provisions:

1. Inmates can earn time credits towards prerelease custody or supervised release by participating in evidence-based, productive activities.

2. The compassionate release process will be expanded, and home confinement opportunities will increase.

3. The Department of Justice will conduct assessments and risk analyses to assign risk levels to inmates.

4. Restraints for pregnant prisoners will be banned.

5. Incarcerated parents will be required to be placed in proximity to their children.

6. Officers will receive de-escalation training to help manage difficult situations.

7. Existing treatment, vocational training, and mental health support programs will be expanded.

The First Step Act significantly changes federal prison and sentencing procedures to reduce the chances of inmates reoffending and help them reintegrate into society. It includes important provisions that revamp rehabilitation opportunities, sentencing guidelines, compassionate release, and more. One key reform is the expansion of evidence-based programs and productive activities for prisoners to reduce the likelihood of reoffending.

Upon successful completion of these programs, eligible inmates can earn time credits, which can be used to obtain early release or supervised release. This initiative is intended to promote participation in vocational training, educational courses, mental health treatment, and other activities aimed at successful rehabilitation. These earned time credits allow prisoners to move to halfway houses or home confinement sooner. Additionally, participation in these programs is evaluated through a comprehensive risk assessment process.

The Act encompasses a series of significant reforms designed to cultivate fairness and empathy within the federal corrections system. It broadens the criteria for compassionate release, ensuring that more individuals qualify for early release based on compelling circumstances. In addition, the Act prohibits the use of restraints on pregnant inmates in the majority of situations, a measure intended to underscore the government’s dedication to upholding the human rights of incarcerated individuals. Moreover, the Act endeavors to refine sentencing practices by retroactively applying the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 and granting judges greater discretion in cases involving nonviolent offenses. These adjustments are pivotal for nurturing successful reentry and rehabilitation initiatives within the federal corrections system.

Good Time Credit – First Step Act

Once convicted, individuals face risk and need assessments (RNA) by correctional agencies to evaluate their reoffense risk and compliance with correctional rules. These tools guide authorities in shaping targeted interventions, ensuring public safety, and utilizing resources efficiently. RNA tools, now a staple in most U.S. correctional systems, promise to elevate correctional standards. However, their current widespread versions are often antiquated and underperforming, falling short of their transformative potential.

After being convicted, individuals undergo risk and need assessments conducted by correctional agencies to evaluate their likelihood of reoffending and their adherence to correctional rules. These assessments help authorities tailor interventions, ensure public safety, and use resources effectively.

The First Step Act significantly changes how federal prisoners can earn time credits for early release from prison or transfer to prerelease custody. The main changes are to the Good Conduct Time (GCT) system and the addition of new earned time credits. Under the Act, the calculation for GCT is changed from 47 to 54 days per year. Besides GCT, eligible prisoners can earn time credits by completing evidence-based recidivism reduction programs. Prisoners can earn 10-15 days of credit for every 30 days served, with the amount determined by their risk level and program participation. This revised good time credit system aims to reward prisoners for demonstrating model behavior and good conduct.

Types of Programs – Earned Time Credits?

After undergoing a comprehensive risk and needs assessment, each works with counselors to create a customized plan that includes programming options matching their talents, needs, and interests. The types of programs available are designed to help inmates develop essential life skills, treatment modalities to overcome addictions and trauma, educational advancement to increase employability, and other evidence-based interventions tailored to addressing criminal risk factors.

While serving their sentences, inmates can demonstrate their commitment to rehabilitation through programming participation and redeem time off their terms through educational, vocational, or counseling accomplishments. Over the last few years, the BOP crafted “standardized Evidence-Based Recidivism Reduction (EBRR) Programs and Productive Activities (PAs).” These are also referred to as “First Step Act Approved Programs.

Are All Federal Offenders Eligible for First Step Act Time Credits?

Not All Prisoners Can Earn Early Release

When the First Step Act became law in 2018, it brought hope of earlier freedom for some federal prisoners. But the reality is more complicated. Many inmates remain excluded despite expanding opportunities to earn time credits off sentences.

Life without parole sentences come with no chance for credits. Those convicted of certain violent crimes like murder, terrorism, and child exploitation also face a firm “no.” If you’re finishing up a supervision term for a previous violation, you must complete it before qualifying for credits.

Then come the “maybes” – offenders with limited eligibility. To earn credits, those guilty of second-degree murder without a firearm or other felonies may need to join recidivism-reduction programs. But access can be restricted. The fine print creates a maze of uncertainty. Even among those technically eligible, bureaucratic roadblocks and limited program availability can dash hopes. Early release often remains elusive.

There is surprisingly little information available to help people calculate the amount of time they will spend in the federal prison system. This website was developed and launched to address this issue. The passage of The First Step Act in 2018 was a historic achievement, but it was just the first step in a long journey toward reform.

In the context of federal prisons, incarcerated individuals can reduce their sentence by 10-15 days for every 30 days of active participation in certain programs. Advocates of a particular law have been urging the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to expand the utilization of home confinement. They recommend that, whenever feasible, individuals with lower risk levels and fewer needs should be considered for placement on home confinement for the maximum allowable duration under Section 3624(c)(2). This section permits home confinement for 10% of the term of imprisonment or six months, whichever is shorter. Additionally, here are comprehensive guidelines on calculating a federal prison sentence.

Total Imposed Sentence: This is the starting point.

Good Time Credit: Calculated by reducing the Total Imposed Sentence by 54 days per year, starting day one.

Experience the benefits of FSA Time Credits! You can earn credits that reduce your sentence by completing approved Evidence-Based Recidivism Reduction (EBRR) Programs or Productive Activities (PAs) tailored to your individual risk and needs assessment. These credits start accumulating after your initial Team Meeting, allowing you to make meaningful progress from the very beginning of your journey. For every 30 days of the sentence served, you receive ten credits per (30-day) month, empowering you to take control of your future. Start accumulating credits from the first day of the month following your initial meeting and pave the way to a brighter tomorrow.

After the second team meeting, which typically takes place around six months after the first, the rate at which FSA Time Credits are earned increases to 15 days for every 30 days served. Similar to the initial credits, additional FSA Time Credits accumulate on the first day of the month following this second team meeting.

ETC, PRD, LDI: Constant delays in the BOP Auto-Calculation of Earn Time Credits

ETC, PRDLDI: Constant delays in the BOP Auto-Calculation of Earn Time Credits

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

Should you wish to engage my services, my Contact Info. is at the end.

2024 FSA ETC – BOP POLICY STATEMENTS: this pdf of the image below has accessible embedded links.

An in-depth post or video is currently being developed.

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my Video series, INDICTED AND FACING PRISON: NOW WHAT? My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I, too, was Indicted and convicted of a felony, and I lost my medical license. To call this a life-altering event, at best, is an understatement. With work, I got my license reinstated— Prison is Temporary.

My goal in this series is to provide you with the information you’ll need to survive and navigate these times. Knowledge and Preparation will help build back the Confidence you’ll need throughout this process.

  • Since you’ve heard that the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case against you is mostly complete, with a 98% Conviction Rate.
  • Delaying to act now is at your peril.
  • Hiring a legal team doesn’t just mean they have experience; they also need a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours.
  • The choices you make today – will make a better tomorrow.

F I R S T S T E P A C T

The 2018 First Step Act (Public Law 115–391) mandates the Department of Justice (DOJ) and its components, including the Bureau of Prisons (BOP), to develop and implement a risk and needs assessment system, provide evidence-based recidivism reduction programs and activities for incarcerated individuals, and apply time credits for early release from secure custody. U.S. Gov’t Accountability Off., GAO-23-105139, 5 (2023).

F I R S T S T E P A C T E A R N E D T I M E C R E D I T S ( E T C )

The First Step Act allows individuals to earn time credits that can potentially reduce their time in secure custody. These time credits can be used for early transfer to prerelease custody (such as home confinement or Residential Reentry Centers) or to supervised release, provided that individuals meet specific eligibility requirements outlined in the First Step Act, in addition to other awards and incentives (see 18 U.S.C. § 3632(d)(1)–(3)). U.S. Gov’t Accountability Off., GAO-23-105139, 16 (2023).

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

In 2018, the BOP was given five years to get up and running = 2023; still, we’re not there, with

  • Staffing shortages
  • Waiting lists, with some programs shuttered

Six months after completing their first assessment, where applicable,

  • this would allow them to increase that individual from 10 ETC per month to
  • then 15 ETC per month

WHAT DEFENDANTS (YOUR CLIENTS) NEED TO KNOW – FRUSTRATION IS NOW A WAY OF LIFE

PRD:  is also the date included on the FBOP’s Federal Inmate Locator found on the public website.

LDI: “Last Date Inside,” “the date on which a federal prisoner should be released to pre-release custody (halfway house or home confinement),” Complaints about BOP management of FSA credits abound. More work for Case managers because,

  1. The calculation tool must be updated every 30 days due to 10-15 FTC and
  2. It does not take into account any of the days that will be earned while in pre-release custody,
  3. RRM offices are not accepting “projected days” earned while waiting for the RRM submission to come back, and this is just the tip of that ever growing iceburg.

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today at 240.888.7778. This is my Cell, and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website: PPRSUS.com.

Violence In Prison (Camps)

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my video series “Indicted and Facing Prison: Now What?” My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I was indicted and convicted of a felony, which led to me losing my medical license. This was a life-altering event, to say the least. However, with hard work, I managed to get my license reinstated. Remember, prison is temporary.

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

FIRST – VIOLENCE IN CAMPS IS VERY RARE FOR MANY REASONS, BUT IT CAN HAPPEN

When dealing with violence, it is crucial to empower yourself by prioritizing respect. Respect is a universal value, forming the bedrock of positive interactions. Always ask permission before sitting on someone else’s bed or borrowing anything. It is empowering to return items in the same condition as you received them and to avoid owing anyone money. These simple actions can help create a harmonious and respectful environment for everyone.

The repercussions of getting into trouble in a satellite or federal prison camp are severe. You could face additional charges, be transferred to a higher-security prison, and lose all your earned time credits (ETC) and good time credit (GTC).

While not frequent, they do occur.

o   Derek Chauvin (stabbed), 47, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murdering George Floyd

o   A federal prison inmate who was able to obtain a firearm at a prison camp in Arizona pulled out the gun in a visitation area and attempted to shoot a visitor

During your trial or plea, you may have felt that you are not guilty. It’s important to remember that there are many innocent people in prison, as well as too many people incarcerated in the US.

For those who believe they are innocent and are fighting through an appeal, I recommend asking your attorney how many appeals they have won, either at the appeal level or before going to trial. It’s important to note that the Department of Justice has a close to 95-98% conviction rate, making the odds of winning very low. Speaking from personal experience, I lost my appeal, and the judge sent me back to prison for another year and a day. It was a difficult experience.

“If you’ve realized that, while you may have believed in your innocence, some aspects of the charges were indeed accurate, no matter how minor, it’s important to focus on what you can influence by sharing with your legal counsel and writing your Narrative and Release Plan, letting the rest to unfold naturally.”

If you have not yet prepared a well-thought-out Personal Narrative for your pre-sentence interview and sentencing hearing or have not created a Release Plan, it’s never too late to include these crucial steps.

These are crucial for the judge, the court, and the correction staff (warden, case managers, and unit team). They need to see that you take responsibility, feel remorse for the victims you have harmed and can tell your life story. Failing to do so means that the Department of Justice has already shared your story with the world through your indictment, and it may not paint you in a positive light.

Wiser individuals than I have said, using their example,

  • If you think there’s life after prison and release, You’re Right,

But,

  • If you feel there’s no life after prison and release, You’re Also Right.

“Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t–you’re right.” ― Henry Ford

I never knew this to be true because I felt I couldn’t fail, but trust me when I say that I initially took minimum wage jobs before reinstating my medical license.

So, we all go through this: Now that you’re in prison, and if you’re lucky, before your pre-sentence interview and sentence, if you’ve had a change of heart regarding your charge, this was the perfect time to take ownership of the crime. What does this mean? It’s never too late to regain your soul.

Judges understand that crimes don’t occur in a vacuum. Attorneys are paid to keep you out of prison. The Department of Justice wants a conviction, no matter what it takes. The Prosecutor wants prison time because they believe you are responsible for all the world’s sins, and they may even have political aspirations.

Judges aim to comprehend the reasoning behind your actions. However, they are also skilled at detecting falsehoods, which can negatively affect you during your discussions with the court.

Remember that judges from across the country unanimously agree that your narrative, release plan, acceptance of responsibility, and demonstration of remorse for the harmed victims can significantly influence the scales of justice in your favor.

Call me Today at 240.888.7778 to engage my services or have your concerns answered. This is my Cell phone number, and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website: PPRSUS.com.

Counsel must object to Inaccurate Facts and Omissions in the Presentence Report

Counsel must object to Inaccurate Facts and Omissions in the Presentence Report. As it will follow you for the rest of your life, It Truly Is The Gift That Keeps on Giving.

Welcome to my video series, ” INDICTED AND FACING PRISON—NOW WHAT?” My name is Marc Blatstein, and I know firsthand how surreal and overwhelming this experience can be. That’s why I’m here to provide you with crucial daily information. You can navigate these challenging times with Knowledge, Preparation, and Confidence.

If the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case is mostly complete. With a 98% conviction rate, the odds are not in your favor. However, knowledge is power, and it’s in your hands. Delaying your next step could have severe consequences.

Your future is at stake, so hiring a legal team with a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours is critical. Don’t just settle for experience; choose a team that can get you the best outcome. Make the right choices now, and you can move forward with confidence tomorrow.

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

Once your attorneys, the prosecutor, and the court have made final rulings on all objections and before the PSR is sent to the BOP, counsel must ensure that the report is updated per the court’s ruling.

·      Asking any court to amend the PSR after sentencing asks the judge to (possibly) change positions he/she has already [adopted as accurate.

·      Even if this can be done – a big if – the amendment process can take years and many attorney hours to complete, not considering the attorney’s hourly fees.

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today at 240.888.7778. This is my Cell, and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.

Mental Healthcare In The BOP Has Limited Availability

Mental Healthcare In The BOP Has Limited Availability

Welcome to my video series, ” INDICTED AND FACING PRISON—NOW WHAT?” My name is Marc Blatstein, and I know firsthand how surreal and overwhelming this experience can be. That’s why I’m here to provide you with crucial daily information. Now, you can navigate these challenging times with Knowledge, Preparation, and Confidence.

The DOJ and Feds have been asking questions; their case is mostly complete. With a 98% conviction rate, the odds are not in your favor. However, knowledge is power, and it’s in your hands. Delaying your next step could have severe consequences.

Your future is at stake, so hiring a legal team with a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours is critical. Don’t just settle for experience; choose a team that can get you the best outcome. Make the right choices now, and you can move forward with confidence.

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

Several First Step Act Programs deal with Mental Health issues, but these programs have very limited availability.

If this applies, it is important enough to be included in their documentation before their Presentence Interview, stressing a placement request.

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today at 240.888.7778. This is my Cell phone number, and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website at PPRSUS.com.

The passing of The First Step Act in 2018 was Serious Legislation

The passing of The First Step Act in 2018 was serious legislation, but it comes with the following caveats;

Frustration and Disappointment Verify that your ETC calculations are up to date and that the BOP is giving you all of the ETC you have earned.

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my Video series, INDICTED AND FACING PRISON: NOW WHAT?

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

Should you wish to engage my services, my Contact Info. is at the end.

My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I, too, was Indicted and convicted of a felony, and I lost my medical license. To call this a life-altering event, at best, is an understatement. With work, I fully reinstated my license: Prison is Temporary.

My goal in this series is to provide you with the information you’ll need to survive and navigate these times. Knowledge and Preparation will help build back the Confidence you’ll need throughout this process.

  • Since you’ve heard that the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case against you is mostly complete, with a 98% Conviction Rate.
  • Delaying to act now is at your peril.
  • Hiring a legal team doesn’t just mean they have experience; they also need a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours.
  • The choices you make today – will make a better tomorrow.

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

Using the information provided in the Presentence Report (PSR),

  • Prisoners are, for the first time in addition to just being incarcerated, now offered a mechanism through FSA Programs, education, and working on their personal development and growth,
  • …to earn credits toward an earlier release date.
  • You can use a computer to take your assessment survey when you first arrive. If you don’t, you may still be able to take the FSA Classes, but you’ll get no credit.

Personal Development and Growth

  • Document – document – document
  • Each and every class you take, what you learn, and now you have a record in case you are challenged months later.
  • Document each conversation with BOP Staff.
  • Education: GED, Associate, Undergrad, Master; or Occupation and Trades training = Personal Growth and Development

All this Documentation = a Release Plan

  • It makes your Case managers look better. Maybe they get a Raise, but this Saying Holds: If you help them get what they want, you’ll get what you want.

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today at 240.888.7778. This is my Cell, and I personally answer and return all calls. You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.

Provide Your Probation Officer With Everything 1-2 weeks Before Your Interview (PSI)

Provide Your Probation Officer With Everything 1-2 weeks Before Your PSI.

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my Video series, INDICTED AND FACING PRISON: NOW WHAT?

My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I, too, was Indicted and convicted of a felony, and I lost my medical license. To call this a life-altering event, at best, is an understatement. With work, I got my license reinstated— Prison is Temporary.

My goal in this series is to provide you with the information you’ll need to survive and navigate these times because Knowledge and Preparation will help build back the Confidence you’ll need throughout this process.

  • Since you’ve heard that the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case against you is mostly complete, with a 98% Conviction Rate.
  • Delaying to act now is at your peril.
  • Hiring a legal team doesn’t just mean they have experience; they also need a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours.
  • The choices you make today – will make a better tomorrow.

Ideally, You want everything provided to the Probation Officer 1-2 weeks before the Presentence Interview.

  • Provides a comprehensive background on the defendant
  • Well written, a Personal NARRATIVE should contain all the information your Probation Officer needs

 

“Why? Probation Officers are:

  1. Overworked and have no time, with some appreciating counsel’s effort in organizing everything they’ve requested and providing it to them early.
  2. They can now take their time to fill in their Probation Report. Then, on the day of the interview, they’ll have the time to personally get to know your client and ask any remaining questions they may have.
  3. At the end of their meeting, the Probation Officer may feel that the defendant took this seriously, leaving them with a more positive view of your client, other than the person referenced in their Indictment.”

a)  It provides information about the offense for which the defendant is being sentenced,

b)  Acceptance of Responsibility and

c)  Victim Remorse statement,

d)  Release Plan,

e)   and where the sentencing guidelines apply.

·  This includes background information about the defendant, such as

·  Criminal history, education, work experience, family background, and health history,

f)   A Realistic Sentence Recommendation and BOP Placement Request Could Also Be Included

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today: 240.888.7778. This is my Cell and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.

THE PRESENTENCE REPORT (PSR) IS YOUR REFERRAL FOR EVERYTHING – GET IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.

THE PRESENTENCE REPORT (PSR) IS YOUR REFERRAL FOR EVERYTHING; GET IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources), is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

Should you wish to engage my services, my Contact Info. is at the end.

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my Video series, INDICTED AND FACING PRISON: NOW WHAT?

My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I, too, was Indicted and convicted of a felony, and I lost my medical license. To call this a life-altering event was, at best, an understatement. With work, I was able to get my license reinstated in full—prison is Temporary.

My goal in this series is to provide you with the information you’ll need to survive and navigate these times because Knowledge and Preparation will help build back the Confidence you’ll need throughout this process.

•  Since you’ve heard that the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case against you is mostly complete, with a 98% Conviction Rate.

•   Delaying to act now is at your peril.

•    Hiring a legal team doesn’t just mean they have experience; they also need a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours.

•   The choices you make today – will make a better tomorrow.

•    The Probation Officer’s PRESENTENCE INTERVIEW CONTROLS ALL FUTURE ASPECTS OF YOUR LIFE AND IMMEDIATE FUTURE.

o If you have Medical Concerns, being Comprehensive could affect Life-or-death outcomes

ALSO PROVIDED AT YOUR PRESENTNECE INTERVIEW:

§     The Personal NARRATIVE,

§     Release Plan and

§     Allocution

§     Your BOP Placement Request

 

IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU SPEND TIME SELF-REFLECTING,

•     THEN, WRITE YOUR AUTOBIOGRAPHY OR LIFE STORY AND EXPLAIN WHAT CAUSED YOU TO BREAK THE LAW WITHOUT

EXCUSES, ACCEPTING RESPONSIBILITY, AND HAVING REMORSE FOR THE VICTIMS YOU HAVE HARMED.

WHY?

·     DID YOU LIKE YOUR FEDERAL INDICTMENT? THAT IS THE DOJ NARRATIVE (OR STORY) OF YOU. TO COUNTER IT, TELL

YOUR OWN STORY OR NARRATIVE.

o   Having Remorse For Your Victim’s Pain

o   It includes You Accepting Responsibility

o   Security Level Requirements

o   Medical and Mental Healthcare Needs

o   Psychology Programs – Limited Availability

o   FSA Programming, and Criminogenic Needs, Risk Assessment

Judges use the PSR to determine the length of a sentence.

·     The Bureau of Prisons (BOP) uses the same PSR for prison placement.

·     Probation again uses the PSR during Supervised Release.

·     Lastly, this same PSR becomes a permanent part of your record and the Inmates Bible – The gift that keeps on giving

·     REDOS ARE VERY FEW, EXPENSIVE, AND HEAVYLIFT.

·     ACCURACY AND COMPLETENESS CANNOT BE OVERSTATED.

·     GETTING A SECOND OPINION IN PRISON CAN TAKE 3 YEARS, AND THE CD DOES NOT HAVE TO FOLLOW THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS

•     Is your Security Level could be in question? Were You a Leader, King Pin, or the one giving Directions to others – If Not, Get This Corrected

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today: 240.888.7778. This is my Cell, and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.

INDICTED: Your Preparation and Participation In Your Defense

INDICTED: Your Preparation and Participation In Your Defense

#PPRSUS, #BOP, #PSR, #WhiteCollar, #crime, #psi, #criminal, #lawyer, #attorney, #ppp, #MoneyLaundering, #arrest, #prisonlife, #federalprison, #ParentChildTalk

The information in this series and on PPRSUS.com (and PPRSUS Resources) is readily accessible and completely Free to all.

Should you wish to engage my services, my Contact Info. is at the end.

Hello, and thank you for tuning into my Video series, INDICTED AND FACING PRISON: NOW WHAT?

My name is Marc Blatstein. In 2006, I, too, was Indicted and convicted of a felony, and I lost my medical license. To call this a life-altering event, at best, is an understatement. With work, I got my license reinstated in full.— Prison is Temporary.

My goal in this series is to provide you with the information you’ll need to survive and navigate these times because Knowledge and Preparation will help build back the Confidence you’ll need throughout this process.

·      Since you’ve heard that the DOJ and Feds have been asking questions, their case against you is mostly complete, with a 98% Conviction Rate.

·      Delaying to act now is at your peril.

·      Hiring a legal team doesn’t just mean they have experience; they also need a proven track record of successfully defending cases like yours.

·      The choices you make today – will make a better tomorrow.

Should you have questions, please do not hesitate to call and consider engaging my services at 240.888.7778—this is your life.

1)   You’ve found your legal team

a.  Followed the 12 – 14 questions to ensure you’ve picked the right attorney for you

b. What does your legal team think about a well-written

i.    Personal NARRATIVE,

ii.    Release Plan

iii.  Along with preparing for your Allocution

c. Then please do as they advise, hoping that they agree with the need for them to be well-written

2)   What can you do to help/advocate for yourself?

3)  Learn what Character letters are and what goes in them, and start requesting them ASAP.

4)  You’ll need copies of ALL your Personal IDs and Background Information.

5)   Their Interview and Conversation with their Judge (Allocution) can decrease or increase your sentence.

a.  Which would you prefer? Will you be ready?

6)  Don’t lie to your attorney (as they don’t wish to be surprised in court) – and try not to Lie to yourself regarding your charges.

7) Don’t lie to your Probation Officer or Judge; they know everything about you.

8)   Don’t provide false information to your lawyer or the court – the last thing your lawyer wants is to be surprised at the last minute

a.   They may be surprised, but you’ll be the only person who suffers as your defense falls apart

To engage my services or to have your concerns answered, Call me Today: 240.888.7778. This is my Cell and I personally answer and return all calls.

You can also get additional information on my website @: PPRSUS.com.