First Step Act – Revised 2022

Reduction in Recidivism

Requires the Attorney General to develop a risk and needs assessment system

  • The BOP assess the recidivism risk and criminogenic needs of all federal prisoners
  • Place them in recidivism reducing programs
  • Including productive activities to address their needs and reduce this risk.
  •  Under the act, the system provides guidance on the:
    • type,
    • amount, and
    • the intensity of recidivism reduction programming and
    • productive activities to which each prisoner is assigned, including
    • information on which programs prisoners should participate in based on their criminogenic needs.
    • on how to group, to the extent practicable,
      • prisoners with similar risk levels together in recidivism reduction programming and
      • housing assignments.
  • The Act also amends 18 U.S.C. § 4042(a), requiring the BOP to assist inmates in:
    • applying for federal and state benefits and
    • obtain identification, including a
      • social security card,
      • driver’s license or
      • other official photo identification, and
      • birth certificate.
  • The First Step Act also expands the Second Chance Act to deliver recidivism reduction programming.

Incentives for Success

  • The Act amended 18 U.S.C. § 3624(b), so that federal inmate can earn:
    • up to 54 days of good time credit for every year of their imposed sentence
    • rather than, for every year of their sentence served.
    • For example, you’re sentenced to 10 years, your maximum good time credit = 540 days.
    • These good-time credits go towards pre-release custody.
    • Ineligible for good-time credit are generally categorized as:
      • violent, or involve
      • terrorism,
      • espionage,
      • human trafficking,
      • sex and sexual exploitation; additionally
      • excluded offenses are a repeat felon in possession of a firearm, or
      • high-level drug offenses
      • For a more complete list, see disqualifying offenses

Confinement

  • 18 U.S.C. § 3621(b) requires the BOP to house inmates in facilities within 500 driving miles of their primary residence.
  • The BOP variety of factors goes into placement, including:
    • bed space availability,
    • security designation,
    • programmatic needs,
    • mental and medical health needs,
    • any request made by the inmate related to faith-based needs,
    • recommendations of the sentencing court, and
    • other security concerns.
  • The FSA reauthorizes and modifies a pilot program that allows the BOP to place certain elderly and terminally ill prisoners on home confinement to serve the remainder of their sentences.

Correctional Reforms

  • Criminal justice-related provisions, including;
    • prohibition on the use of restraints on pregnant inmates in the custody of BOP and the U.S. Marshals Service.
    • requirement the BOP to provide tampons and sanitary napkins for free
    • The FSA requires BOP to provide training to correctional officers and other BOP employees:
      • on how to interact and de-escalate encounters with people who are diagnosed with mental illness or other cognitive deficits.
      • Also included is a prohibition against the use of solitary confinement for juvenile delinquents in federal custody.

Sentencing Reforms

  • Changes to Mandatory Minimums for Certain Drug Offenders for some drug traffickers with prior drug convictions
    • the threshold for prior convictions that count toward triggering higher mandatory minimums for repeat offenders,
      • is reduced from the 20-year to a 15-year mandatory minimum,
    • The life-in-prison mandatory minimum (where there are two or more prior qualifying convictions),
      • to a 25-year mandatory minimum.
  • Retroactivity of the Fair Sentencing Act (FSA)
    •  Those who received longer sentences for crack cocaine than if sentenced for possession of powder cocaine can submit a petition in federal court to have their sentences reduced.
  • Expanding the Safety Valve

FEMALE PATTERN RISK SCORING

MALE PATTERN RISK SCORING

Violent Offense Codes for PATTERN Risk Assessment *

Cut points used when calculating an inmate’s Risk of Recidivism

Ambridge Man Pleads Guilty to Possessing Fentanyl 12/2020

Possessing Fentanyl – DOJ

In early December 2020, Michael Gamble was paid a surprise visit by law enforcement. At the conclusion of their search, they found at least 90 G of Fentanyl along with a loaded handgun with an attached extended magazine. None of this looks good, and easily crosses an Offense Level of 34 (with its approximate base number of 28 or greater). Michael Gamble, age 37, pleaded guilty to one count before United States District Judge Christy Criswell Wiegand and is scheduled sentencing for Feb. 9, 2023.

The DOJ has a case, and while everyone deserves legal representation, in the federal system 98% plea as opposed to going to trial, but I get ahead of myself.

How over the years did a medication initially develop in 1959 by Dr. Paul Janssen as an intravenous surgical anesthetic, wind up on our streets? Recalling my days as a surgical resident in the mid-1980s, this was on no one’s radar, except anesthesia. Interest came initially from large animal veterinarians, which morphed into skin patches for humans in the early 2000s to treat chronic pain. This was followed with user-friendly delivery options; a lollipop, tablet, and nasal spray.

Carfentanyl, a fentanyl analog is approximately 10,000 times more potent than morphine, 100 times more than fentanyl, and 50 times more than heroin. It is to be used as a general anesthetic for very large animals.

Fentanyl (Carfentanyl) analogs, including fentanyl-laced heroin, come in many flavors, with street names such as white heroin, Perc-O-Pops, Chiclets, Apache, China Girl, White China, Dance Fever, Jackpot, Murder 8, TNT, Tango and Cash, Friend, Goodfella, and Redrum (murder spelled backward). The sheer variety and combinations make toxicology testing and accurate death reporting extremely challenging.

Having a cogent defense, that includes sentence mitigation through presentence interview preparation is key. Should you have a question, contact us.

Probation Officers | Federal | The PSR

Probation Officers Representing The Court:

They Conduct The Presentence Interview,

This is critical – as from it they prepare

Your Presentence Report (PSR),

Which acts as your “referral” to

The Federal Bureau of Prisons for everything

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For a No Obligation Free Consult Call Dr.Blatstein at: 240.888.7778, or through email at: info@PPRSUS.com. Dr. Blatstein answers and personally returns all of his calls.

Probation receives and evaluates pre-sentence investigation requests.

Their Process:

  • 1st they interview you, and then
    • Identify and pursue leads to obtain evidence.
    • Gather and document evidence by interviewing involved parties, obtaining statements, reviewing and analyzing records and files, etc.
    • Gather criminal history, police reports, victim impact statements, criminal complaints, and information and review them prior to the interview with the offender.
    • Conduct offender criminal history checks, warrant inquiries, and driver’s license abstract checks.
    • Compile and maintain history and case records.
    • Inform offenders of their rights, responsibilities, and purposes of the pre-sentence investigation process.
    • Interview offenders are required by the courts to have a pre-sentence investigation completed.
    • Utilize PSI interview guide and the Criminogenic Domains of Criminal History, Education/Employment, Financial, Family/Marital, Accommodation, Leisure/Recreation, Companions, Alcohol/Drug, Emotional/Personal, and Attitude/Orientation.
    • Complete various extensive assessment tools to gauge offender risk and needs.
    • Collect PSI fees.
    • Coordinate investigations with other law enforcement agencies, regulatory agencies, and other relevant entities.
    • Confirm information gathered during the interview.
    • Communicate with the appropriate Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation staff, other state agencies, related organizations, other entities, volunteers, and the public to provide information, referral services, technical advice, and consultation regarding PSI.
    • Communicate with Courts, attorneys, law enforcement, and other agencies involved in a court-ordered pre-sentence investigation.
    • Document interview and investigation.
  • Identify and Inform crime victims of their rights.
    • Assist the victim advocates in coordinating victim requests for offender information; victim issues such as recovery from injury, financial losses, or victim mediation; preparation of victim impact statements and reports; communicate offender progress and victim assistance to various local, state, and federal officials, and to treatment staff.

Prepare The Presentence Report and

Recommend administrative, legal, and/or sentencing action.

  • Present evidence to prosecutors, legal staff, or courts.
  • Prepare and present testimony as required for legal proceedings or administrative hearings.
  • Report offender compliance with the presentence investigation to courts.
  • Summarize information gathered during the investigation and interview into the pre-sentence format.

Make sentencing recommendations

  • based on sentencing guidelines and a thorough analysis of:
  • Ensure the report is distributed according to Applicable Code standards.
  • Monitor programs for compliance with state and federal laws compliance.
  • Gather, compile, and maintain statistics for required and requested reports.
  • Investigate and confirm the information on offender release plans or interstate compact investigations.
  • Maintain working knowledge of the Department of Correction and Rehabilitation (DOCR) programs and community-based programs that are available for offenders.

Note: The duties of probation officers listed above are not intended to be all-inclusive.

Federal Sentencing and Placement – The Process

98% of federal defendants plea

Federal Sentencing

1st: Federal Defendants indicted, >93% likely will receive a federal sentence to a BOP facility

 

2nd: The defendant’s first appearance in court
  • ~93+%, can result in either a plea or verdict of guilty to a federal sentence
  • Between the Defendant’s 1stand, 2nd court appearance; a resume or CV of the defendant’s background is developed: called the Presentence Report (PSR).
  • The PSR is where the Defense Team Can make a Placement Request, while documenting the defendant’s medical, criminal, work & education histories, etc.
3rd: The defendant’s second court appearance is for the Sentencing Hearing
  • The details of sentencing are not taught in most law schools
  • Judges determine the length of time the defendant is imprisoned
  • Judges can also make a placement request to the BOP
4th: The BOP determines placement
  • Some of the factors that affect placement (BOP Policy Statement P5100.08 (Chapter 4 Pages 5-13 and Chapter 5 Pages 12-13):
    • Judges recommendations
    • Public Safety Factor (PSF) Variables
      • Accepting Responsibility
      • Age
      • Criminal History
      • Education Level
      • Legal Release Residence
    • Management Variables; Pre-determined Security levels
      • Disruptive Group-confirmed member
      • Greatest Offense Severity #
      • Greatest Severity Offense
      • Prison Disturbance
      • Serious escape
      • Serious Telephone Abuse
      • Sex Offender
      • The threat to Government Officials
    • Medical CARE LEVELS I-IV Structure
    • Mental Healthcare CARE LEVELS I-IV Structure
    • Psychology Treatment Programs
    • Medication Availability

      • On Formulary, or available
      • Non-Formulary requires a lengthy preapproval process
      • Or Just Not Available, where a similar substitute may be implemented

For Groups: My PowerPoint Presentation

Mental Healthcare In The BOP – Is This Your Client?

Serious Mental Illness In The BOP 

The BOP provides Medical and Mental Healthcare (MH), through their 4 CARE LEVELS.

The BOP’s Psychology Data System (Page 2) Is Filled Out For All MH Levels.

The Designation and Sentence Computation Center places inmates into Care Levels 1 and 2

CARE LEVEL 1 MH

  • No Significant Need.
  • No history of serious functional impairment due to mental illness
  • No need for regular mental health visits
  • No hospitalization in the last 5 years
  • Defendant on their own has sought help
  • Controlled with 2 psychotropic meds (Not MH I if taking antipsychotic)
  1. Psychotropic medications:
    • anti-anxiety agents
    • mood stabilizers
    • stimulants
  2. Antipsychotic medicines, 
    • delusions (false, fixed beliefs) or
    • hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that are not really there).
    • schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or
    • very severe depression (also known as “psychotic depression”).
  • Clinical visits q 6 mo

CARE LEVEL 2 MH

  • He/she has a mental illness requiring:
  • Routine Ongoing Outpatient visits
    • Medication controlled,
    • Medical visits q 1-6 months
    • Group Therapy, interventions every other week
  • Crisis Oriented, BRIEF MH Care, g., placement on suicide watch
  • Psychiatric Hospitalizations within the last 5 yrs
  • On Antipsychotic or 2 psychotropic meds

CARE LEVEL III & IV designation is made by the BOP’s Office of Medical Designations and Transportation

 CARE LEVEL 3 MH

  • Not In-patient
  • Enhanced Outpatient (Requires outpatient contacts with a prescribing doc > than monthly [at least weekly]); or
  • Housed in A Residential Treatment Program.
  • 2+ Psychiatric Hospitalizations within the last 3 yrs
  • 3+ anti-psychotic meds [Or > 5 meds for multiple Dx]

If you have a client with an MH CARE LEVEL of III, and a Medical CARE LEVEL of II,
The MH placement takes precedence.

Care Level 4 MH

  • Inpatient
    • gravely disabled and
    • cannot function in the general population, as in CARE3-MH
    • medical care 24/7/365
  • Tx plan reviewed every 90 days

Federal Prison Placement Preparation

The Presentence Report

1st. Prepare For Your Presentence Interview

Properly prepared, will allow the probation Office to draft an accurate

Presentence Report – which will control your future

Incorporate these federal prison placement data points:

Medical and Mental Healthcare needs to be implemented through

  • Psychological Treatment Programs while available, have limited access and several may be security level specific.

The First Step Act Includes;

I) Brave Program A first-timer young male offender 32 years of age or younger, facing a sentence of 60 months or more

II) Challenge Program A male inmate facing a high-security penitentiary with a current diagnosis of either: Mood, Anxiety, Schizophrenia, Delusion, and/or Substance-induced Psychotic Disorders

III) Mental Health Step Down A male or female who lacks the skills to function in a general population prison setting and is willing to work with Psychiatry Services

IV) Resolve A male or female with a current diagnosis of a mental illness related to physical, mental, and/or intimate domestic violence or traumatic PTSD

V) Skills A significant functional impairment due to intellectual disabilities, neurological and/or remarkable social skills deficits such as Autism Spectrum Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) to mention just a few.

VI) Stages  A male inmate with a serious mental illness and a primary diagnostic of Borderline Personality Disorder, along with a history of unfavorable institutional adjustment.

VIIa) Sex Offender Non-Residential Single Sex Crime or first-time Internet Sex Offense

VIIb) Sex Offender Residential Multiple sex crimes.

VIIc) Butner’s Commitment and Treatment Program for Sexually Dangerous Persons, Page 12Is considered for sexually dangerous persons with the possibility of criminal recidivism

VIII) Female Integrated Treatment Is a female with substance abuse (RDAP Eligibility Possible), trauma-related disorders, and other mental illnesses. (FIT) Program

Medication availability falls into 3 tiers:

  1. On the BOP Formulary (available).
  2. Non-Formulary; these require a lengthy preauthorization process.
  3. Last: these are just not available. While similar medications are substituted, how is their efficacy verified?

Security Requirements

  1. Offense Level vs Criminal History Calculation
  2. Criminal History Calculation
    • +3 points for each prior sentence > 1 Year + 1 Month.
    • +2 points for each prior sentence > 60 days, not counted above.
    • +1 point for each prior sentence, <= 60 days not counted above; for up to a maximum of 4 points in this category.
    • +2 points for each revocation that has a new charge or occurs under federal supervision.
    • + 1 point for each prior sentence resulting from a conviction of a crime of violence that did not receive any points as noted above because the sentence was treated as a single sentence, up to a total of 3 points for this subsection.

The BOP and Prison Security Level Placement

The Presentence Report – A Medical, Medication, and Security Requirement Referral

PPRSUS.com

As found in my LinkedIn 2/29/2020 post

Healthy Steps for Older Adults 2022

FSA, Productive Activities (PA)
Healthy Steps for Older Adults 2022

Program Description Healthy Steps for Older Adults is an evidence-based falls prevention program designed to raise participants’ knowledge and awareness of steps to take to reduce falls and improve health and well-being. The goal of the program is to prevent falls, promote health, and ensure that
older adults remain as independent as possible for as long as possible.
Hours 3
Location(s) All institutions
Needs Addressed Medical/Recreation/Leisure/Fitness
Program Delivery Contractors
Health Services
Recreation
Unit Team
Volunteers

AARP Foundation Finances 50+ (2022)

AARP Foundation Finances 50+ (2022)

Program Description

This program provides financial education and counseling for vulnerable households, particularly adults age 50+.

Older adults face unique challenges in financial planning and weak job prospects. This program will assist the older adult in financial goal setting that translates into positive financial behaviors.

Hours 1.5
Location(s) All BOP Locations
Needs Addressed Finance/Poverty

Schizophrenia in Federal Prison

PPRS - PPRSUS - Physician Presentence Report Service
Schizophrenia in Federal Prison

 

In federal prison, Schizophrenia is a mix of symptoms that varies from person to person and affects the mind. When severe, people have trouble staying in touch with reality. It’s hard for someone to think clearly, make good judgments, respond emotionally, communicate effectively, understand reality, and behave appropriately. There is no cure, and treatment requires a psychiatrist-guided team approach, which includes a psychologist, social worker, psychiatric nurse, and possibly a case manager to coordinate care.

Anxiety may present as a component, along with Posttraumatic stress disorder, as a symptom of a co-occurring disorder. While Schizophrenia is a serious brain illness, there is no test for it. Diagnosis requires eliminating what it’s not occurring, in order to identify the symptoms that are present.

There are three types of symptoms:

  1. Psychotic symptoms may distort thinking, including hallucinations, delusions (beliefs that are not true), and organizing thoughts.
  2. Negative symptoms: where you’re not able to show emotions – leaving you to present yourself as depressed and withdrawn.
  3. Cognitive symptoms: Trouble making decisions and paying attention.

There is no cure. Different medications may have to be tried to see which are effective because medications affect each person individually. Once you find the medication(s) that work, stay on them daily, keep your doctor’s appointments and follow their recommendations.

Schizophrenia

Changes in behavior;

Includes delusions and hallucinations – which may last a lifetime.

Delusions; False beliefs, not based on reality, such as another person is in love with you, or a major catastrophe is about to occur.

Hallucinations involve seeing or hearing things that don’t exist. They can be in any of the senses, hearing voices is the most common hallucination.

Disorganized thinking and speech may include putting together meaningless words that can’t be understood, sometimes known as word salad. Extremely disorganized or abnormal motor behavior can include resistance to instructions, inappropriate or bizarre posture, a complete lack of response, or useless and excessive movement. All of these behaviors can result in less than optimal interactions between other inmates or with correction staff. The result may be a trip to the hospital or the SHU (isolation), neither is acceptable, and both are preventable.

Negative symptoms can be expressed as, neglecting personal hygiene, appearing to lack emotion, (not; making eye contact, changing facial expressions, or speaking in a monotone), and losing interest in everyday activities, including socially withdrawing.

Treatment is accomplished under the psychiatrist-guided treatment team approach with a case manager coordinating care. The full-team approach may be available in clinics with expertise in schizophrenia treatment. These delusions and hallucinations — may last your lifetime.

First-generation older antipsychotics, introduced in the 1950s – As a class, these provided treatment for acute agitation, bipolar mania, and other psychiatric conditions.

On- Formulary Medications: Haloperidol (Haldol), Perphenazine (Trilafon), Loxapine, Trifluoperazine(Stelazine), and Fluphenazine

Not AvailableFlupentixol, Zuclopentixol, Sulpiride, Pimozide, Molindone, Prochlorperazine, Thioridazine, and Thiothixene

Second-generation or atypical antipsychotics,

Some associated side effects; “Schizophrenia in adults“Bipolar mania and hypomania in adults“,  “Unipolar major depression with psychotic features“,  “Delusional disorder”,   “Brief psychotic disorder”, and  “Treatment of postpartum psychosis”

On Formulary: Clozapine (Clozaril) “Clozapine remains the only antipsychotic that has been FDA-approved for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, “and it provides effective treatment even when patients do not respond to other second-generation antipsychotics. No existing first- or second-generation antipsychotic is as effective as clozapine monotherapy in treatment-resistant patients. Deanna Kelly, Pharm.D., of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center (MPRC)” Other Medications: Olanzapine (Zyprexa), and Risperidone (Risperdal).

Medications Non-Formulary: Quetiapine (Seroquel)

Some of the more recent atypical antipsychotics:

Medications Not AvailableAsenapine (Saphris), Iloperidone (Fanapt), and Lurasidone (Latuda).

Schizophreniform

Symptoms of schizophreniform

Schizophreniform is a similar disorder that affects how you act, think, relate to others, express emotions, and perceive reality.

Unlike schizophrenia, it lasts one to six months.

A mental condition that can distort the way you:

  • Think.
  • Act.
  • Expresses emotions.
  • Perceive reality.
  • Relate to others.

Medication and Psychotherapy —to help the patient manage everyday problems related to the disorder.

Medications On Formulary: Click here for the article…

Brief psychotic disorder

Involves a sudden, short period of psychotic behavior, often in response to a very stressful event, such as a death in the family. Recovery is often quick — usually less than a month.

The first line of treatment may include atypical antipsychotics.

Medications On Formulary: Click here for the article…

Medications Non-Formulary:   Click here for the article…

For those that have an increased risk of having depression, medications that address this symptom can be an important part of their treatment.

Delusion disorder

The key symptom is having a delusion (a false, fixed belief) involving a real-life situation that could be true but isn’t, such as being followed, being plotted against, or having a disease. The delusion lasts for at least 1 month.

The exact cause is not yet known, but researchers are looking at genetic, biological, environmental, or psychological factors.

A cold, detached manner with the inability to express emotion

  • …has an over-inflated sense of worth, power, knowledge, or identity.
  • Jealous
  • …that someone is spying on them or planning to harm them.
  • …believes that he or she has a physical defect or medical problem.
  • …have two or more of the types of delusions listed above.

Symptoms that are ‘non-bizarre’:

  • An irritable, angry, or low mood
  • Hallucinations

Diagnosis: There are no laboratory tests to yield positive results, they are only good to rule out what it is not.

Treatment:

  • Psychotherapy is primary
  • Conventional antipsychotics

First-generation older antipsychotics, introduced in the 1950s – 

1st Generation, Medications On- Formulary for available medications: Click here for the article…

2nd Generation, Medications On- Formulary for available medications: Click here for the article…

Medications Non-Formulary medications require pre-authorization; click here for the article…

Other types of medications:

  1. Antidepressants might be used to treat depression, which often happens in people with delusional disorder
  2. Psychotherapy can also be helpful, along with medications, as a way to help people better manage and cope with the stresses related to their delusional beliefs and their impact on their lives.
  3. Sedatives and antidepressants might also be used to treat anxiety or mood symptoms if they happen with delusional disorder.
  4. Tranquilizers might be used if the person has a very high level of anxiety or problems sleeping.

Shared psychotic disorder (also called folie à deux)

Here one person in a relationship has a delusion and the other person in the relationship adopts that same delusion.

Diagnosing is difficult, possibly with an MRI.

Treatment: Psychotherapy aims to ease emotional distress, with medication to ease the symptoms of anxiety.

It cannot be prevented, and the key is to diagnose and treat them as soon as possible.

Substance-induced psychotic disorder

Substance-related disorders involve drugs that directly activate the brain’s reward system which typically causes feelings of pleasure.

The classes of drugs include

·       Alcohol

·       Caffeine

·       Cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids

·       Hallucinogens (eg, LSD, phencyclidine, psilocybin)

·       Inhalants (volatile hydrocarbons [eg, paint thinner, certain glues])

·       Opioids (eg, fentanylmorphineoxycodone)

·       Sedatives, hypnotics, and anxiolytics (eg, lorazepamsecobarbital)

·       Stimulants (eg, amphetaminescocaine)

·       Tobacco

·       Other (eg, anabolic steroids)

Treatment/Management

Clinical judgment, with a proper history, creates a safe environment during the withdrawal period. Due to the relative safety of most antidepressants in the setting of depressive symptomatology, and manic episode guidelines, second-generation antipsychotics, such as Quetiapine (Non-Formulary) or Olanzapine (On Formulary), may also be beneficial as they are faster-acting than mood stabilizers.

Psychotic disorder; due to other medical conditions;

Hallucinations, delusions, or other symptoms may happen because of another illness that affects brain function, such as a head injury or brain tumor.

Paraphrenia: symptoms similar to schizophrenia.

It starts late in life in the elderly,

  • Generally has a much better prognosis than other psychotic disorders.
  • Antipsychotic medication can be helpful,
  • Paraphrenia sometimes co-occurs with depression and anxiety

I) BOP Placement Based On Security Level Alone – Without Multiple Medication Needs

The Challenge Program – an EBBR FSA Evidence-based Recidivism Reduction Program for male inmates in Penitentiary (High Security) facilities. Treats those with substance abuse and/or mental illness disorders (psychotic, mood, anxiety, or personality).

II) BOP Placement- With Multiple Medication Needs v Prior Hospitalizations

Here, it depends;

  • the number of types of psychiatric hospitalizations, not related to substance abuse, and
  • the number of multiple diagnoses treated with antipsychotic and/or different psychotropic medications

Influences Mental Healthcare (MH) CARE LEVEL I-IV facility placement.

Sex Offender Programs – Federal Prison

PPRS - PPRSUS - Physician Presentence Report Service

FEDERAL PRISON SEX OFFENDER:

BOP PROGRAMMING WITH 2 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE

SEX OFFENDER PROGRAM RESIDENTIAL (SOTP-R) is a voluntary program (P5324.10) for Sex Offenders, and those with a history of multiple sexual offenses, re-offense, extensive non-sexual criminal histories, and/or a high level of sexual deviancy or hypersexuality. Inmates ordinarily participate in the program during the remaining 36 to 48 months of their sentence. The duration of the program is 12-18 months. Placement in the SOTP-R is reserved for inmates with more extensive sex offense histories, and cohousing participants permit the implementation of a modified therapeutic community, separate from the general population.

Having only 2 SOTP-R facilities nationwide – before they enter the program, initial placement into a free-standing Federal Prison Camp (FPC), or satellite minimum camp (adjacent to a higher secure facility), if practical, should be part of the court’s calculation.

This is because should an inmate consider acting violently towards your client – most would likely refrain as a single incident would have them transferred behind the wall, to a higher security facility, which they would not want.

Ultimately it just may come down to you knowing your client and the facility recommendation options available during the period before SOTP-R placement. Keep in mind that no matter what the BOP says, this could be a real-life event, therefore having this discussion with your client may prove crucial.

BOP PROGRAMMING WITH 9 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE

SEX OFFENDER PROGRAM NON-RESIDENTIAL (SOTP-NR), is also a voluntary program (P5324.10) for low to moderate first-time sex offenders with a single history of Internet Sex Crime, intended to identify offenders who are likely to re-offend. Inmates ordinarily participate in the program during the remaining 36-48 months of their sentence. SOTP-NR participants reside in the general population.

Having only 9 facilities nationwide – before they enter the SOTP-NR program, if practical, other than an FPC, or satellite minimum camp, should an inmate act violently towards your client – again, they would most likely refrain, as a single incident would have them transferred behind the wall, to a higher security facility. Otherwise, any other placement could result in a life-threatening sentence.

Consideration may again come down to knowing your client and understanding the facility options available for the period before their SOTP-NR placement.

BOP, 1 LOCATION NATIONWIDE

BUTNER’S COMMITMENT AND TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR SEXUALLY DANGEROUS PERSONS (2022-2023), “This FCI remains a flagship facility and is frequently chosen to pilot new programs such as the Sex Offender Commitment and Treatment Program,” (Page 6).

  • FCI Butner is responsible for the psychological treatment and implementation of behavior management plans, with the coordination of the multidisciplinary treatment teams. Treatment is holistic and multidimensional with the ultimate goal of reducing sexual dangerousness and criminal recidivism potential.
  • FCC Butner has an internship integrated practitioner-scholar model which seeks “the productive interaction of theory and practice in a primarily practice-based approach to inquiry”. The internship component of the Psychology Service strives to meet the training needs of doctoral candidates in applied psychology through supervised experience, didactic programs, and focused scholarship.
  • As there is only 1 location, which appears ‘court ordered’, there should be no other issues regarding inmate threats.

Fore more…